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Prof Graham Hart
Faculty of Population Health Sciences
Suite 1A, Maple House
149 Tottenham Court Road
LONDON
W1T 7JA
Appointment
  • Professor of Sexual Health and HIV Research
  • Faculty of Pop Health Sciences
  • School of Life & Medical Sciences
Role
Dean
Biography

Professor Graham J Hart graduated from the University of Leicester 1st Class Hons in Social Sciences (1978) and was awarded his PhD from the University of Kent at Canterbury (1982).

He was appointed Lecturer in Medical Sociology at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School (1986) and Associate Director of the MRC Social & Public Health Sciences Unit at the University of Glasgow (1994). 

He returned to UCL as Professor of Sexual Health & HIV Research in 2006, and became inaugural Dean of the Faculty of Population Health Sciences in August 2011.

Graham was inaugural Chair of the Department of Health Policy Research Commissiong Panel (2011-2013) and is currently: NIHR Sub-Panel Chair for Programme Grants in Applied Health Research; Chair of the MRC/DfID African Research Leader Scheme.  He is an NIHR Senior Investigator, and Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Research Summary

Professor Graham J Hart's research interests include sexual risk behaviour and the prevention of HIV and STIs, combining structural, behavioural and biomedical approaches to prevention and the opportunities afforded by new prevention technologies.He has worked with a wide range of populations at risk of HIV and STIs, nationally and internationally. This includes men who have sex with men, young people, sex workers, and vulnerable groups in developed and developing countries.

His major contributions are to health policy and promotion, particularly in HIV and sexual health. Two significant examples are: needle exchange for injecting drug users (IDU); HIV prevention in men who have sex with men (MSM).

After needs assessment which found high levels of sharing of drug injecting equipment amongst IDU he was instrumental in setting up, and then evaluating, the first dedicated needle-exchange in the UK and the roll-out of this harm reduction strategy in England and Wales using combined behavioural and biomarker data. This work has been cited internationally, helped with the adoption of harm minimisation globally, and contributed to reduced parenteral transmission of HIV throughout the world.

His research on men who have sex with men is widely cited, and has informed HIV prevention strategies in the UK and internationally. He undertook the first community based survey of prevalent HIV using oral fluid antibody tests and the first UK evaluation of peer-education for risk reduction in MSM. He led work which first described in Scotland increased risk-behaviour after the introduction of HIV therapy in the mid-1990s, and subsequently specified the undiagnosed fraction of HIV in community-recruited MSM across the UK. This work also demonstrated high levels of sexual risk taking in HIV positive men. These studies have informed the development of HIV prevention in MSM in the UK and internationally, and been vital for government and NGO prevention efforts.

Teaching Summary

MSc in Sexually Transmitted Diseases & HIV;

MSc in Health Psychology;

MBBS.

Appointments
01-AUG-2011 Dean Faculty of Population Health Sciences UCL, United Kingdom
Academic Background
1982 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Sociology University of Kent
1978 BA Hons Bachelor of Arts (Honours) – Social Science University of Leicester
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