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Prof Ivan Gout
Darwin Building
Gower St
London
WC1E 6BT
Appointment
  • Professor of Cancer Biochemistry
  • Structural & Molecular Biology
  • Div of Biosciences
  • Faculty of Life Sciences
Research Themes
Research Summary
I graduated as an MD at Lviv Medical University (Ukraine) in 1983 with a great passion to become a surgeon in oncology. Thinking that a PhD in experimental oncology would help to realise my dream, I obtained my doctorate at the Institute of Experimental Oncology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in 1987. A fellowship from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) took me even further from clinical oncology and also from the Ukraine. I arrived in London on the first wave of perestroika and began my post-doctoral training in Jim Woodgett's laboratory at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (UCL Branch). Subsequently I worked in Mike Waterfield's laboratory at the same Institute studying signal transduction via the PI3 kinase pathway. In 1998, I started my own group at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, focussing on the regulation of growth via the S6 kinase pathway. Since 2003, I have been a Professor in this Department, where I have an active research group working on signal transduction via the mTOR/S6K pathway in normal and cancer cells. Since 1998, I have also managed a laboratory (jointly with Prof. V. Filonenko) at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics in Ukraine, which is affiliated to the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research through the Kerr Programme. My current research interests are in the regulation of cell growth and metabolism in normal and cancer cells. We focus mainly on: a) elucidation of cell growth, metabolism and proliferation via the mTOR/S6K pathway; b) the role of Coenzyme A and its derivatives in cellular metabolism and gene expression. In collaboration with academic and industrial partners, we pursue the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for cancer. Research Interest The main focus of our research is the study of basic mechanisms by which cell growth and metabolism are regulated in normal and cancer cells. There are two major areas of interest in the laboratory: a) regulation of cell growth, metabolism and proliferation via the mTOR/S6K pathway; b) the role of Coenzyme A and its derivatives in cellular metabolism and gene expression. The development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for cancer is the ultimate goal of our research, which we pursue through collaboration with academic and industrial partners. a) Regulation of cell growth, metabolism and proliferation via mTOR/S6K pathway Molecular cloning of the second isoform of S6 kinase, which we termed S6K? or S6K2, was a cornerstone for establishing an independent research platform that further extended into signalling via the mTOR pathway. The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is a central regulator of an evolutionary conserved signalling pathway which controls cellular metabolism, growth and proliferation. These functions are mediated through the formation of multienzyme complexes and the phosphorylation of key signalling molecules, such as protein kinases S6K and PKB/Akt, and a negative regulator of translation, 4E-BP1. Deregulation of mTOR-coordinated signalling has been associated with various human pathologies, including diabetes, inflammation and cancer. Rapamycin, a naturally occurring mTOR inhibitor, and its homologues are currently being tested as anti-cancer drugs in numerous clinical trials. The mechanisms by which the mTOR/S6K pathway controls energy metabolism, cell growth and proliferation are studied in the lab at the biochemical, cellular and organism level. To elucidate downstream signalling from S6K1 and S6K2, we employ DNA microarrays, siRNA knockdowns, yeast two hybrid screening and affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry. Using these approaches we have identified a panel of novel S6K binding partners/substrates, which link S6K to the regulation of cellular metabolism and transcription.
Teaching Summary
I am the Graduate Admission Tutor in the Department, the Lead Tutor in Biotechnology for the MRes in Biosciences and course organizer BIOL2014. I lecture and give tutorials on growth regulation and cell signalling to second and third year students. I also supervise third year students for laboratory projects. Course organizer: FEBS Advances Lecture and Practical course on fundamental techniques in mammalian cell biology, Kyiv, Ukraine, 2009 FEBS Advances Lecture and Practical course on fundamental techniques in mammalian cell biology, UCL, London, 2011
Academic Background
1987 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Biochemistry National Academy of Science
1983 MD Doctor of Medicine – Medicine Lviv Medical University
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