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Prof Karen Radner
209
History Department
25 Gordon Square
London
WC1E 6BT
Appointment
  • Professor of Ancient Near Eastern History
  • Dept of History
  • Faculty of S&HS
Biography

I grew up in Austria and studied at the universities of Vienna and Berlin. I held academic appointments at the universities of Helsinki and Munich before joining UCL in 2005.

Research Summary

I specialise in the history of the ancient Middle East from the third to first millennium BC when the cuneiform script was used to record a range of languages. My main research interests belong to the kingdom of Assyria (14th to 7th century BC) and especially its imperial phase from the 9th century onwards when this pathfinder empire shaped political, social, economic and religious developments between the Mediterranean and Iran. Other topics central to my research are the historical topography of the Middle East and Mesopotamia's legal history.

I have worked on excavations and survey projects in Greece, Iraq (including the Kurdish Autonomous Region), Syria and Turkey and served as the field epigrapher at Tell Sheikh Hamad (ancient Dur-Katlimmu) in Syria, Giricano (ancient Dunnu-Ň°a-Uzibi) and Birkleyn (so-called "Tigris Grotto") in Turkey and Assur in Iraq.

Much of my published work can be downloaded from academia: http://ucl.academia.edu/KarenRadner

Teaching Summary

I teach undergraduate courses covering the history of the Middle East from c. 3000 to 300 BC, that is from the emergence of written sources to the end of the Persian period. My third year "special subject" course deals with the Assyrian Empire and the period from the 9th to the late 7th century BC, which is the subject of my main research. My MA teaching focuses on the Middle East in the first millennium BC and covers the Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian and Seleukid empires.

Academic Background
2004 HAB Habilitation – Assyriology Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen
1997 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Archaeology Universitat Wien
1994 MA Master of Arts – Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Archaeology Universitat Wien
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