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Dr Marc Amoyel
Lab 514
Rockefeller Building
21 University Street
London
WC1E 6DE
Appointment
  • Senior Research Fellow
  • Cell & Developmental Biology
  • Div of Biosciences
  • Faculty of Life Sciences
Research Summary

We use the fruit fly to study stem cell competition.

Stem cells have a social life and interact with other cells around them. They need support cells, which make up what is known as the niche, to provide them with signals in order to remain stem cells. We now know that each stem cell is in constant competition with neighbouring stem cells for those niche signals. The winner stays in contact with the niche, while the loser is pushed out and doesn't give rise to any more stem cells. Therefore, in order to contribute to tissues in the long term, stem cells need to be good at competing for space in the niche.

We use a combination of genetics, live imaging, mathematical modelling and genomics approaches to understand what makes one stem cell able to compete with its neighbours.
We focus on several related questions :
- How do stem cells interpret the signals they receive from the niche to become more or less competitive ?
- These signals act by making stem cells divide faster. How does the rate of cell cycle progression affect the competitive ability of a stem cell ?
- As well as niche signals, there are signals that make stem cells more likely to differentiate. We investigate how a single cell chooses to differentiate, and what changes happen within that cell as it leaves the niche.

Appointments
01-AUG-2018 MRC Career Development Fellow Cell and Developmental Biology UCL, United Kingdom
01-SEP-2017 – 31-JUL-2018 MRC Career Development Fellow School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine University of Bristol, United Kingdom
Academic Background
2005 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Developmental Biology National Institute for Medical Research
2001 BSc Bachelor of Science – Biology University College London
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