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Prof Zhaoping Li
805 Malet Place Engineereing Building
London
WC1E 6BT
Tel: 020 7679 2850
Fax: 020 7387 1397
Appointment
  • Professor of Computational Neuroscience
  • Dept of Computer Science
  • Faculty of Engineering Science
Research Summary
I obtained my B.S. in Physics in 1984 from Fudan University, Shanghai, and Ph.D. in Physics in 1989 from California Institute of Technology. I was a postdoctoral researcher in Fermi National Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois USA, Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton New Jersey, USA, and Rockefeller University in New York USA. In 1998, I helped to found the Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit in University College London. Currently, I am a Professor of computational neuroscience in the Department of Computer Science in University College London. My research experience throughout the years ranges from areas in high energy physics to neurophysiology and marine biology, with most experience in understanding the brain functions in vision and olfaction. My researches in different areas of brain functions (sensory, motor, and memory functions) share a common methodology of mathematically analysing the behavior and nonlinear dynamics of neural circuits, and I have been regularly invited to give lectures at international workshops and summer schools on modeling the neural circuits. In late 90s and early 2000s, I proposed a theory (which is being extensively tested) that the primary visual cortex in the primate brain creates a saliency map to automatically attract visual attention to salient visual locations.
Academic Background
1989 PhD Doctor of Philosophy – Physics California Institute of Technology
1984 BS Bachelor of Science – Physics Fudan University
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