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Dr Dan Bang
Appointment
  • Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Research Fellow
  • Imaging Neuroscience
  • UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
  • Faculty of Brain Sciences
Biography


APPOINTMENTS

2019-: Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow, Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, UCL

2015-2019: Postdoctoral Research Associate, Wellcome Centre for Human Neuroimaging, UCL, Supervisor: Dr Steve Fleming


EDUCATION

2011-2015: DPhil Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Supervisors: Profs Christopher Summerfield & Jennifer Lau

2010-2011: MSc Cognitive & Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford, Supervisor: Prof Robin Dunbar

2006-2010: BA Linguistics, Aarhus University, Supervisor: Prof William McGregor


Research Summary

I study how humans build mental models of the world for behavioural control, with a focus on social behaviour. Social interaction is remarkably complex: an action that is rewarded in one context may be punished in another, and what we think or feel may clash with the behaviour that is required of us. I seek to understand how humans solve such problems, using behavioural testing, computational modelling and neuroimaging. These techniques allow me to characterise the cognitive processes underlying behaviour and study their implementation in the brain. A biologically-informed account of human social behaviour is important for advancing our understanding of disorders of mental health. Many mental disorders are social in nature – they manifest in interactions between people – but we lack a mechanistic explanation of what has gone awry.


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