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Dr Elvira Bramon
Appointment
  • Clinical Reader/ Honorary Consultant in Biological Psychiatry
  • Division of Psychiatry
  • Faculty of Brain Sciences
 
 
Biography

Elvira Bramon completed her medical degree at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and then her early specialist psychiatry training (MIR) at the Hospital Mútua de Terrassa – Universitat de Barcelona. In 1999 she moved to the Institute of Psychiatry – King’s College London and Maudsley Hospital to do her PhD and further training in psychiatry. She always combined research, clinical and teaching activities. She held several academic posts at the Institute of Psychiatry from clinical lecturer to reader in psychiatry and worked at the Maudsley Hospital initially as associate specialist and by 2005 as consultant psychiatrist. At the Institute she held a Wellcome Trust research training fellowship, subsequently a NIHR post-doctoral fellowship and most recently a MRC New Investigator Award. Elvira joined UCL in 2012 as reader in biological psychiatry and is based at the Mental Health Sciences Unit and the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Research Summary

I’m interested in biological markers of brain function and structure that can be used to characterise psychosis. In particular, I have expertise in using EEG techniques like evoked potentials and quantitative EEG and have also worked with structural imaging and cognitive biomarkers for psychosis.

I moved to UCL to develop a new programme applying EEG analysis methods to investigate brain dysfunction underlying genetic vulnerability towards psychosis. While EEG and other imaging biomarkers are important in themselves to understand the pathophysiology of the disease, ultimately I plan to use them as alternative phenotypes to explore the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence the risk of developing psychosis.

In the last few years I have been running a genome wide association study of psychosis endophenotypes with colleagues in Australia and Europe. I am also working on the effect that rare structural variants have in phenotypes of EEG/MRI/cognition. I am interested in pharmacogenomics, especially for antipsychotic and mood stabilising drugs.

Teaching Summary

I supervise two PhD students based at King’s College London. Since I joined UCL in August 2012 I have been supervising one PhD student, two research fellows and one BSc student. I teach at several MSc programmes at the Institute of Psychiatry and UCL.

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