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Dr Helen Matthews
1.24
MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology
University College London
London
WC1E 6BT
Appointment
  • Research Associate
  • MRC/UCL Lab for Molecular Cell Bio
  • Faculty of Life Sciences
Biography
2008       Postdoctoral Research Associate, MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, UCL
2004       PhD in Developmental Biology with Roberto Mayor at UCL
2003       MSci project at Institute for Human Genetics, University Heidelberg, Germany
2000       MSci Biochemistry, Imperial College London
Research Groups
Research Themes
Research Summary
My primary research interest is cell morphology, specifically how cells are able to dynamically alter their shape and polarity through regulated changes to the actin cytoskeleton.

My PhD work examined cell migration using a population of embryonic cells, the neural crest in Xenopus and Zebrafish, as a model system. I addressed the question of how a group of cells is able to migrate in a coordinated and directional manner through a complex 3-dimensional space such as the early embryo.

Currently, I am researching the regulation of cell shape during division. During mitosis, cells in tissue culture undergo profound changes in cells morphology. Initially, they detach from the substrate and become round, before elongating and separating into two daughter cells at cytokinesis. I am trying to discover how the cell cycle 'clock' that controls the timing of cell division is able to dynamically regulate the actin cytoskeleton to control these sequential cell shape changes.
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