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Prof Mark Ford
236
English Dept., UCL
Gower St.
London
WC1E 6BT
Tel: 0207 6793129
Appointment
  • Professor of English Literature
  • Dept of English Lang & Literature
  • Faculty of Arts & Humanities
Biography

Mark Ford was born in 1962 in Nairobi, Kenya. He went to school in London. He has a BA and a DPhil from the University of Oxford. In the academic year 1983-84 he was a Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University, and from 1991 to 1993 a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Kyoto in Japan. He has published four collections of poetry, Landlocked (1991), Soft Sift (2001), Six Children (2011) and Selected Poems (2014). He has also published a biography of the French writer Raymond Roussel, and a parallel text edition of Roussel’s final poem, Nouvelles Impressions d’Afrique (New Impressions of Africa). He is a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and the London Review of Books, and a selection of his reviews and essays have been published in three volumes, A Driftwood Altar (2005),  Mr and Mrs Stevens and Other Essays (2011) and This Dialogue of One, which was awarded the 2015 Pegasus Prize for Criticism. His anthology London: A History in Verse was published by Harvard University Press in 2012, and his monograph Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner in 2016.

Research Themes
Research Summary

Mark Ford has published widely on nineteenth-, twentieth- and twenty-first century British, American, and French literature. He is particularly interested in the work of the New York School of poets, and has published editions of the poetry of John Ashbery and Frank O'Hara. He is also interested in French literature, and is the leading Anglophone expert on the work of Raymond Roussel. Subjects of recent essays by Mark Ford include Ted Hughes, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Walt Whitman, W.H. Auden, Wallace Stevens, T.S. Eliot, Nicholas Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Marilynne Robinson, Flannery O’Connor, Randall Jarrell, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, James Fenimore Cooper, Georges Perec, Vladimir Nabokov, Baudelaire and Javier Marìas. He is one of the literary executors of the poet Mick Imlah, and has edited a volume of Imlah's Selected Poems for Faber & Faber.

Mark Ford's publications and research interests nearly all relate to the Department's three principal literary fields: the City, Editions, and Life Stories. He has a great interest in New York-based poets from the advent of modernism to the present day, and in the interface between New York and Parisian culture throughout this period. He has also edited the anthology, London: A History In Verse. His publications include editions of Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, James Schuyler, and Kenneth Koch. He is the author of the first full-length biography in English of the French poet, playwright, and novelist, Raymond Roussel, and, most recently, the monograph Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner.

Teaching Summary

Mark Ford teaches on American Literature to 1900, Moderns I (1890-1945) and Moderns II (1945 to the present day). He has supervised PhD students on topics such as the poetry of Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot and Frank O'Hara.

Academic Background
1992 DPhil Doctor of Philosophy – English University of Oxford
1983 BA Bachelor of Arts – English Language and Literature University of Oxford
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