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Dr Shih-Che Hsu
Dr Shih-Che Hsu profile picture
Appointment
  • Research Fellow in Building Stock and Indoor Air Quality Modelling
  • Bartlett School Env, Energy & Resources
  • Faculty of the Built Environment
Biography
Shih-Che has expertise in environmental health, indoor environmental quality, quantified energy policy impacts, and Geographic Information System. His research mainly focuses on how climate change mitigation policy affects the health and wellbeing of residents in the building. Prior to joining UCL, Shih-Che gained his master degree from environmental health institute and bachelor degree from public health department of National Taiwan University, and worked in the school for epidemiology analysis and industry as an Environment, Safety and Heath engineer.
Research Summary
Energy use and health status represent two of the most important 'outcome factors' when assessing loss caused by climate change and benefits brought by mitigation policies. However, the perception of the distant impacts of climate change makes it hard for people hard to visualize the chain of effects resulting from the initial energy use and how health is affected and therefore understand the urgent need of mitigation investment. Using GIS could visualise the health impact of environmental change and helps people accept the mitigation strategies more easily. By combining the quantified value of energy strategies and the subsequent impacts on environment and human health under different climate risk locations, the analysis will seek to provide causal associations and a more complete and innovative measure for risk assessment. The visual results make policymakers see the results of mitigation strategies more directly. 
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