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Dr Victoria Redclift
41
27-28 Woburn Square
London
London
WC1H 0AA
Appointment
  • Lecturer
  • IOE - Social Science
  • UCL Institute of Education
Biography

Victoria is a Political Sociologist in the Department of Social Sciences at the UCL IoE. After an MSc in Social Policy and Development Studies at the LSE (for which she was awarded the Richard Titmuss Prize for outstanding performance) she won the LSE's first four year Bonnart-Braunthal PhD scholarship in the Department of Sociology. The monograph that resulted from her PhD, entitled Statelessness and Citizenship: Camps and the creation of 'political space' (Routledge, 2013), was shortlisted for the British Sociological Association Phillip Abrams Memorial Prize. Her work pays particular attention to spatial formations of political exclusion, histories of displacement and the formation of diaspora, and the negotiation of local and global political subjectivity. She has worked at the LSE, the University of Manchester and the University of Surrey, and joined UCL in 2018.


Victoria is on the International Editorial Boards for 'Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power' and 'Ethnic and Racial Studies'. She became a Trustee of the Bonnart-Braunthal Trust (which funds postgraduate research into the study of religious, racial and cultural intolerance) in 2016, and she is on the Runnymede Trust Academic Forum.

Research Summary

Victoria Redclift's research interests are in the sociology of migration with particular focus on citizenship and political exclusion. Her work is orientated around four main areas:

- Citizenship and statelessness - particularly as they relate to conditions of colonialism and coloniality
- The intersections of 'race', class and gender in the reproduction of political exclusion
- Diaspora and transnationalism
- Intra-minority identity and hidden minorities

Following her PhD, and funded by a British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grant (SG121376 - April 2013 - April 2015), Victoria spent two years conducting research into the historical legacy of conflict in the formation of identities and relations among South Asian Muslims in the UK and the US. Tracing the stories of North Indian 'Bihari' Muslims who fled East Bengal as a result of the Liberation War in 1971, establishing themselves in various cities across the UK and North America, the research considered how 'intra-minority' relations interrogate Muslim identities in different diasporic contexts. Victoria was subsequently awarded a Phillip Leverhulme Prize, for a project entitled 'From Brick Lane to Little Bangladesh: Transnational Political Space in London and Los Angeles' (PLP-2014-221 - October 2015-October 2020) and an ESRC Future Research Leaders Grant for a project on 'Transnational Practices in Local Settings: Experiences of Citizenship among Bangladesh-origin Muslims in London and Birmingham (ES/N000986/1 - April 2016 - December 2019). The research takes the form of a trifocal study into experiences of citizenship among Bangladesh-origin Muslims in London, Birmingham and Los Angeles, developing the concept of 'transnational political space' in order to better understand the impact of receiving society conditions on transnational identities and relations.

Teaching Summary

Victoria teaches on the Social Science Seminar - a core third year module for the BSc in Social Sciences.


She welcomes enquiries from doctoral students conducting research in the areas of:


-Citizenship and statelessness

-Diaspora and transnationalism

-Anti-Muslim racism

-South Asian Muslim identities in the UK, the US and Bangladesh

-Forced migration, displacement and 'the camp' as a social form

-Qualitative methods - especially semi-structured and narrative interviews, inter-generational methods, ethnography and case studies.

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