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Publication Detail
An ecology of the suburban hedgerow, or: how high streets foster diversity over time
  • Publication Type:
    Conference
  • Authors:
    Vaughan LS, Törmä I, Dhanani A, Griffiths
  • Publisher:
    University College London
  • Publication date:
    17/07/2015
  • Place of publication:
    London
  • Pagination:
    99:1, 99:19
  • Published proceedings:
    http://www.sss10.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/proceedings/
  • Status:
    Published
  • Name of conference:
    10th International Space Syntax Symposium
  • Conference place:
    University College London
  • Conference start date:
    13/07/2015
  • Conference finish date:
    17/07/2015
Abstract
This paper builds on the proposition by Penn and colleagues (2009) that cities provide a structured set of social, cultural and economic relations which help to shape patterns of diversity in urban areas. Far from being a random mixing, it could be said that urban systems are akin to ecological systems where flora and fauna are closely interrelated and in which the richness and evenness of species in a community contributes to the overall resilience of the ecosystem. This study goes further in suggesting how a variety of building types, sizes and street morphologies are more likely to propagate patterns of co-presence over time - providing the minimal but essential everyday 'noise' without which generalised sustainability and liveability agendas are likely to flounder when faced with questions of implementation in particular places. This morphological diversity, it is argued, enables the development of niche markets in smaller centres which can support new forms of socio-economic activity.
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The Bartlett School of Architecture
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The Bartlett School of Architecture
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The Bartlett School of Architecture
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