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Publication Detail
Diverse cities or the Systematic Paradox of Urban Scaling Laws
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Cottineau C, Hatna E, Arcaute E, Batty M
  • Publication date:
    31/05/2016
  • Journal:
    Computers, Environment and Urban Systems
  • Issue:
    Spatial analysis with census data
  • Print ISSN:
    1873-7587
  • Keywords:
    Urban Scaling, Socioeconomic attributes, Cities, Size, Urban delineation., Urban Scaling, Socioeconomic attributes, Cities, Size, Urban delineation
Abstract
Scaling laws are powerful summaries of the variations of urban attributes with city size. However, the validity of their universal meaning for cities is hampered by the observation that different scaling regimes can be encountered for the same territory, time and attribute, depending on the criteria used to delineate cities. The aim of this paper is to present new insights concerning this variation, coupled with a sensitivity analysis of urban scaling in France, for several socio- economic and infrastructural attributes from data collected exhaustively at the local level. The sensitivity analysis considers different aggregations of local units for which data are given by the Population Census. We produce a large variety of definitions of cities (approximatively 5000) by aggregating local Census units corresponding to the systematic combination of three definitional criteria: density, commuting flows and population cutoffs. We then measure the magnitude of scaling estimations and their sensitivity to city definitions for several urban indicators, showing for example that simple population cutoffs impact dramatically on the results obtained for a given system and attribute. Variations are interpreted with respect to the meaning of the attributes (socio-economic descriptors as well as infrastructure) and the urban definitions used (understood as the combination of the three criteria). Because of the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) and of the heterogeneous morphologies and social landscapes in the cities' internal space, scaling estimations are subject to large variations, distorting many of the conclusions on which generative models are based. We conclude that examining scaling variations might be an opportunity to understand better the inner composition of cities with regard to their size, i.e. to link the scales of the city-system with the system of cities.
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