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Publication Detail
From Protecting the Heart to Improving Athletic Performance – the Benefits of Local and Remote Ischaemic Preconditioning
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Review
  • Authors:
    Sharma V, Marsh R, Cunniffe B, Cardinale M, Yellon DM, Davidson SM
  • Publication date:
    01/12/2015
  • Pagination:
    573, 588
  • Journal:
    Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
  • Volume:
    29
  • Issue:
    6
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0920-3206
Abstract
© 2015, The Author(s).Remote Ischemic Preconditioning (RIPC) is a non-invasive cardioprotective intervention that involves brief cycles of limb ischemia and reperfusion. This is typically delivered by inflating and deflating a blood pressure cuff on one or more limb(s) for several cycles, each inflation-deflation being 3–5 min in duration. RIPC has shown potential for protecting the heart and other organs from injury due to lethal ischemia and reperfusion injury, in a variety of clinical settings. The mechanisms underlying RIPC are under intense investigation but are just beginning to be deciphered. Emerging evidence suggests that RIPC has the potential to improve exercise performance, via both local and remote mechanisms. This review discusses the clinical studies that have investigated the role of RIPC in cardioprotection as well as those studying its applicability in improving athletic performance, while examining the potential mechanisms involved.
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