UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Ethnic differences in long-term improvement of angina following revascularization or medical management: a comparison between south Asians and white Europeans.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Zaman MJ, Crook AM, Junghans C, Fitzpatrick NK, Feder G, Timmis AD, Hemingway H
  • Publication date:
    2009
  • Pagination:
    168, 174
  • Journal:
    Journal of Public Health
  • Volume:
    31
  • Issue:
    1
  • Print ISSN:
    1741-3842
  • Keywords:
    ethnicity, prognosis, South Asian, stable angina, angina, angina pectoris
  • Addresses:
    Clinical Epidemiology Group, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether there are disparities in morbidity outcomes between south Asians and whites with established coronary disease. METHODS: Six-year prospective cohort study to determine whether improvement of angina symptoms differs between 196 south Asians and 1508 whites following revascularization or medical management. RESULTS: 43.9% of south Asians reported improvement in angina at 6 years compared with 60.3% of whites (age-adjusted OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.41-0.76, adjusted for diabetes, hypertension, smoking, number of diseased vessels, left ventricular function and social class OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.41-0.85). Similar proportions of whites and south Asians underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (19.6% versus 19.9%) and coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) (32.8% versus 30.1%). South Asians were less likely to report improved angina after PCI (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.56) or CABG (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.74). There was less evidence of ethnic differences in angina improvement when treatment was medical (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.48-1.57). CONCLUSION: South Asians were less likely to experience long-term improvements in angina than whites after receipt of revascularization. Further research is needed to identify why these ethnic groups differ in symptomatic prognosis following revascularization for coronary disease and how these differences may be mitigated.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
Author
Clinical Epidemiology
Author
Institute of Health Informatics
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by