UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: A unified framework.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Review
  • Authors:
    Moustafa AA, Chakravarthy S, Phillips JR, Gupta A, Keri S, Polner B, Frank MJ, Jahanshahi M
  • Publication date:
    12/07/2016
  • Pagination:
    727, 740
  • Journal:
    Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
  • Volume:
    68
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Print ISSN:
    0149-7634
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Department of Veterans Affairs, New Jersey Health Care System, East Orange, NJ, United States; School of Social Sciences and Psychology & Marcs Institute for Brain and Behaviour, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Marcs Institute for Brain and Behaviour, Western Sydney University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Electronic address: a.moustafa@westernsydney.edu.au.
Abstract
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a range of motor symptoms. Besides the cardinal symptoms (akinesia and bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity), PD patients show additional motor deficits, including: gait disturbance, impaired handwriting, grip force and speech deficits, among others. Some of these motor symptoms (e.g., deficits of gait, speech, and handwriting) have similar clinical profiles, neural substrates, and respond similarly to dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Here, we provide an extensive review of the clinical characteristics and neural substrates of each of these motor symptoms, to highlight precisely how PD and its medical and surgical treatments impact motor symptoms. In conclusion, we offer a unified framework for understanding the range of motor symptoms in PD. We argue that various motor symptoms in PD reflect dysfunction of neural structures responsible for action selection, motor sequencing, and coordination and execution of movement.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by