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Publication Detail
Late-onset Lafora disease with prominent parkinsonism due to a rare mutation in EPM2A.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Lynch DS, Wood NW, Houlden H
  • Publication date:
    16/08/2016
  • Pagination:
    e101
  • Journal:
    Neurology. Genetics
  • Volume:
    2
  • Issue:
    5
  • Medium:
    Electronic-eCollection
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Department of Molecular Neuroscience (D.S.L., N.W.W., H.H.), UCL Institute of Neurology; and Neurogenetics Laboratory (H.H.), National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London.
Abstract
Lafora disease (LD) is an autosomal recessive form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy that is caused by mutations in EPM2A, encoding laforin, and NHLRC1 (EPM2B), encoding malin.(1) LD is classically described with onset in early teenage years. Patients develop myoclonus, epilepsy, visual hallucinations, and psychosis. Dementia is a prominent feature and often occurs in the late teenage years. LD typically progresses quickly, and patients become bedridden and dependent within 10 years of symptom onset, with life expectancy in the early 20s.(2,3) Only a small number of late-onset cases of LD have been described. Even then, these so-called late-onset cases have typically presented in the 20s, with dementia occurring in the early 30s. We describe a patient with extremely late onset and extended survival with prominent parkinsonism due to a novel EPM2A variant.
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
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Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
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