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Publication Detail
N250 effects for letter transpositions depend on lexicality: casual or causal?
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Dunabeitia JA, Molinaro N, Laka I, Estevez A, Carreiras M
  • Publication date:
    2009
  • Pagination:
    381, 387
  • Journal:
    NeuroReport
  • Volume:
    20
  • Issue:
    4
  • Print ISSN:
    0959-4965
Abstract
We examined the electrophysiological correlates of one of the most influential orthographic effects: The transposed-letter masked priming effect. Transposed-letter nonword-word pairs were included (jugde-judge), as well as transposed-letter wordword pairs (casual-causal) to investigate the influence of prime’s lexicality in the transposed letter effect. The results showed that when compared against the substituted letter control conditions (jugde-judge vs. jupte-judge), transposed-letter primes produced a lower negativity in the N250 component. In contrast, no differences were obtained between the two word-word priming conditions (casual-causal vs. carnalcausal). The influence of lexicality in the transposed-letter effect is discussed according to models of visual word recognition and previous evidence from ERPs.
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