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Publication Detail
Wide variation in susceptibility of transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype C Isolates to protease inhibitors and association with in vitro replication efficiency
Abstract
© 2016 The Author(s).The gag gene is highly polymorphic across HIV-1 subtypes and contributes to susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PI), a critical class of antiretrovirals that will be used in up to 2 million individuals as second-line therapy in sub Saharan Africa by 2020. Given subtype C represents around half of all HIV-1 infections globally, we examined PI susceptibility in subtype C viruses from treatment-naïve individuals. PI susceptibility was measured in a single round infection assay of full-length, replication competent MJ4/gag chimeric viruses, encoding the gag gene and 142 nucleotides of pro derived from viruses in 20 patients in the Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project acute infection cohort. Ten-fold variation in susceptibility to PIs atazanavir and lopinavir was observed across 20 viruses, with EC50 s ranging 0.71-6.95 nM for atazanvir and 0.64-8.54 nM for lopinavir. Ten amino acid residues in Gag correlated with lopinavir EC50 (p < 0.01), of which 380 K and 389I showed modest impacts on in vitro drug susceptibility. Finally a significant relationship between drug susceptibility and replication capacity was observed for atazanavir and lopinavir but not darunavir. Our findings demonstrate large variation in susceptibility of PI-naïve subtype C viruses that appears to correlate with replication efficiency and could impact clinical outcomes.
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Div of Infection & Immunity
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Div of Infection & Immunity
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Div of Infection & Immunity
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