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Publication Detail
Genetic variants in ALDH1B1 and alcohol dependence risk in a British and Irish population: A bioinformatic and genetic study
Abstract
© 2017 Way et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.Alcohol is metabolized in the liver via the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Polymorphisms in the genes encoding these enzymes, which are common in East Asian populations, can alter enzyme kinetics and hence the risk of alcohol dependence and its sequelae. One of the most important genetic variants, in this regards, is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs671 in ALDH2, the gene encoding the primary acetaldehyde metabolizing enzyme ALDH2. However, the protective allele of rs671 is absent in most Europeans although ALDH1B1, which shares significant sequence homology with ALDH2, contains several, potentially functional, missense SNPs that do occur in European populations. The aims of this study were: (i) to use bioinformatic techniques to characterize the possible effects of selected variants in ALDH1B1 on protein structure and function; and, (ii) to genotype three missense and one stop-gain, protein-altering, non-synonymous SNPs in 1478 alcohol dependent cases and 1254 controls of matched British and Irish ancestry. No significant allelic associations were observed between the three missense SNPs and alcohol dependence risk. The minor allele frequency of rs142427338 (Gln378Ter) was higher in alcohol dependent cases than in controls (allelic P = 0.19, OR = 2.98, [0.62-14.37]) but as this SNP is very rare the study was likely underpowered to detect an association with alcohol dependence risk. This potential association will needs to be further evaluated in other large, independent European populations.
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Division of Psychiatry
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Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
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