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Publication Detail
Disorganized attachment in infancy: A review of the phenomenon and its implications for clinicians and policymakers
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Granqvist P, Sroufe LA, Dozier M, Hesse E, Steele M, Van IJzendoorn M, Solomon J, Schuengel C, Fearon RMP, Bakermans-Kranenburg M, Steele H, Cassidy J, Carlson E, Madigan S, Jacobvitz D, Foster S, Behrens K, Rifkin-Graboi A, Gribneau N, Spangler G, Ward MJ, True M, Spieker S, Reijman S, Reisz S, Tharner A, Nkara F, Goldwyn R, Sroufe J, Pederson D, Pederson D, Weigand R, Siegel D, Dazzi N, Bernard K, Fonagy P, Waters E, Toth S, Cicchetti D, Zeanah CH, Lyons-Ruth K, Main M, Duschinsky R
  • Publisher:
    Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date:
    26/07/2017
  • Journal:
    Attachment and Human Development
  • Print ISSN:
    1461-6734
  • Keywords:
    Disorganized attachment, Infancy, Attachment-based interventions, Maltreatment, Attachment disorder
Abstract
Disorganized/disoriented (D) attachment has seen widespread interest from policy-makers, practitioners and clinicians in recent years. However some of this interest seems to have been based on some false assumptions: that (1) attachment measures can be used as definitive assessments of the individual in forensic/child protection settings, and that disorganized attachment (2) reliably indicates child maltreatment, (3) is a strong predictor of pathology, and (4) represents a fixed or static ‘trait’ of the child, impervious to development or help. This consensus statement reviews what is known about disorganized infant attachment and clarifies the implications of the classification for clinical and welfare practice with children. In particular, the difference between disorganized attachment and attachment disorder is examined, and a strong case is made for the value of attachment theory for supportive work with families and for the development and evaluation of evidence-based caregiving interventions.
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