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Publication Detail
Modulatory effects of 5Hz rTMS over the primary somatosensory cortex in focal dystonia--an fMRI-TMS study.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Schneider SA, Pleger B, Draganski B, Cordivari C, Rothwell JC, Bhatia KP, Dolan RJ
  • Publication date:
    15/01/2010
  • Pagination:
    76, 83
  • Journal:
    Mov Disord
  • Volume:
    25
  • Issue:
    1
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    United States
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Brain Mapping, Discrimination, Psychological, Dystonic Disorders, Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen, Somatosensory Cortex, Statistics, Nonparametric, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Abstract
Dystonia is associated with impaired somatosensory ability. The electrophysiological method of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can be used for noninvasive stimulation of the human cortex and can alter cortical excitability and associated behavior. Among others, rTMS can alter/improve somatosensory discrimation abilities, as shown in healthy controls. We applied 5Hz-rTMS over the left primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in 5 patients with right-sided writer's dystonia and 5 controls. We studied rTMS effects on tactile discrimination accuracy and concomitant rTMS-induced changes in hemodynamic activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Before rTMS, patients performed worse on the discrimination task than controls even though fMRI showed greater task-related activation bilaterally in the basal ganglia (BG). In controls, rTMS led to improved discrimination; fMRI revealed this was associated with increased activity of the stimulated S1, bilateral premotor cortex and BG. In dystonia patients, rTMS had no effect on discrimination; fMRI showed similar cortical effects to controls except for no effects in BG. Improved discrimination after rTMS in controls is linked to enhanced activation of S1 and BG. Failure of rTMS to increase BG activation in dystonia may be associated with the lack of effect on sensory discrimination in this group and may reflect impaired processing in BG-S1 connections. Alternatively, the increased BG activation seen in the baseline state without rTMS may reflect a compensatory strategy that saturates a BG contribution to this task.
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