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Publication Detail
Emotional arousal and recognition memory are differentially reflected in pupil diameter responses during emotional memory for negative events in younger and older adults.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Hämmerer D, Hopkins A, Betts MJ, Maaß A, Dolan RJ, Düzel E
  • Publication date:
    10/2017
  • Pagination:
    129, 139
  • Journal:
    Neurobiology of aging
  • Volume:
    58
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Print ISSN:
    0197-4580
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK; The Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, London, UK; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany. Electronic address: d.hammerer@ucl.ac.uk.
Abstract
A better memory for negative emotional events is often attributed to a conjoint impact of increased arousal and noradrenergic modulation (NA). A decline in NA during aging is well documented but its impact on memory function during aging is unclear. Using pupil diameter (PD) as a proxy for NA, we examined age differences in memory for negative events in younger (18-30 years) and older (62-83 years) adults based on a segregation of early arousal to negative events, and later retrieval-related PD responses. In keeping with the hypothesis of reduced age-related NA influences, older adults showed attenuated induced PD responses to negative emotional events. The findings highlight a likely contribution of NA to negative emotional memory, mediated via arousal that may be compromised with aging.
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