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Publication Detail
NKX2-1 Is Required in the Embryonic Septum for Cholinergic System Development, Learning, and Memory.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Magno L, Barry C, Schmidt-Hieber C, Theodotou P, Häusser M, Kessaris N
  • Publication date:
    15/08/2017
  • Pagination:
    1572, 1584
  • Journal:
    Cell reports
  • Volume:
    20
  • Issue:
    7
  • Medium:
    Print
  • Print ISSN:
    2211-1247
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: l.magno@ucl.ac.uk.
Abstract
The transcription factor NKX2-1 is best known for its role in the specification of subsets of cortical, striatal, and pallidal neurons. We demonstrate through genetic fate mapping and intersectional focal septal deletion that NKX2-1 is selectively required in the embryonic septal neuroepithelium for the development of cholinergic septohippocampal projection neurons and large subsets of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In the absence of NKX2-1, these neurons fail to develop, causing alterations in hippocampal theta rhythms and severe deficiencies in learning and memory. Our results demonstrate that learning and memory are dependent on NKX2-1 function in the embryonic septum and suggest that cognitive deficiencies that are sometimes associated with pathogenic mutations in NKX2-1 in humans may be a direct consequence of loss of NKX2-1 function.
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Cell & Developmental Biology
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Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research
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Wolfson Inst for Biomedical Research
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Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

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