UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Structural evidence for the dopamine-first mechanism of norcoclaurine synthase.
Abstract
Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) is a Pictet-Spenglerase that catalyzes the first key step in plant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism, a compound family that includes bioactive natural products such as morphine. The enzyme has also shown great potential as a biocata-lyst for the formation of chiral isoquinolines. Here we present new high-resolution X-ray crystallography data describing Thalictrum flavum NCS bound to a mechanism inspired ligand. The structure supports two key features of the NCS 'dopamine-first' mechanism: the binding of dopamine catechol to Lys-122 and the position of the carbonyl substrate binding site at the active site entrance. The cata-lytically vital residue Glu-110 occupies a previously unobserved ligand-bound conformation, highlighting the complex role of this residue in the enzyme mechanism. The potential roles of inhibitory binding and alternative amino acid conformations in the mechanism have also been revealed. This work significantly advances our un-derstanding of the NCS mechanism and will aid future efforts to engineer the substrate scope and catalytic properties of this useful biocatalyst.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
There are no UCL People associated with this publication
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by