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Publication Detail
Plasticity induced by non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation: A position paper.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Review
  • Authors:
    Huang Y-Z, Lu M-K, Antal A, Classen J, Nitsche M, Ziemann U, Ridding M, Hamada M, Ugawa Y, Jaberzadeh S, Suppa A, Paulus W, Rothwell J
  • Publication date:
    01/11/2017
  • Pagination:
    2318, 2329
  • Journal:
    Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
  • Volume:
    128
  • Issue:
    11
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1388-2457
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Neuroscience Research Center and Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan; School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Electronic address: yzhuang@cgmh.org.tw.
Abstract
Several techniques and protocols of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NIBS), including transcranial magnetic and electrical stimuli, have been developed in the past decades. Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation may modulate cortical excitability outlasting the period of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation itself from several minutes to more than one hour. Quite a few lines of evidence, including pharmacological, physiological and behavioral studies in humans and animals, suggest that the effects of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation are produced through effects on synaptic plasticity. However, there is still a need for more direct and conclusive evidence. The fragility and variability of the effects are the major challenges that non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation currently faces. A variety of factors, including biological variation, measurement reproducibility and the neuronal state of the stimulated area, which can be affected by factors such as past and present physical activity, may influence the response to non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation. Work is ongoing to test whether the reliability and consistency of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation can be improved by controlling or monitoring neuronal state and by optimizing the protocol and timing of stimulation.
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