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Publication Detail
Neuropsychological and Neuropsychiatric Features of Idiopathic and DYT1 Dystonia and the Impact of Medical and Surgical treatment.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Jahanshahi M
  • Publication date:
    11/2017
  • Pagination:
    888, 905
  • Journal:
    Archives of clinical neuropsychology : the official journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists
  • Volume:
    32
  • Issue:
    7
  • Medium:
    Print
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0887-6177
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Cognitive Motor Neuroscience Group, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience & Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1N 3BG, UK.
Abstract
Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder, characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Executive dysfunction is a feature of cognitive function in idiopathic and DYT1 dystonia. Psychiatric morbidity is increased in dystonia, and depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorders are the most common disorders. Sleep problems and pain are also frequently experienced. Evidence suggest that mood and anxiety disorders are intrinsic to the neurobiology of dystonia, but also that psychiatric co-morbidity can be secondary to pain experience and the psychosocial functioning and quality of life of the patients. Medical treatment of dystonia with botulinum toxin injections into affected muscles or with deep brain stimulation surgery improves the symptoms as well as mood and the quality of the patients and does not produce any adverse effects on cognitive function.
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