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Publication Detail
Capillary pericytes mediate coronary no-reflow after myocardial ischaemia.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    O'Farrell FM, Mastitskaya S, Hammond-Haley M, Freitas F, Wah WR, Attwell D
  • Publication date:
    09/11/2017
  • Journal:
    eLife
  • Volume:
    6
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    2050-084X
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
Abstract
After cardiac ischaemia, a prolonged decrease of coronary microvascular perfusion often occurs even after flow is restored in an upstream artery. This 'no-reflow' phenomenon worsens patient prognosis. In the brain, after stroke, a similar post-ischaemic 'no-reflow' has been attributed to capillary constriction by contractile pericytes. We now show that occlusion of a rat coronary artery, followed by reperfusion, blocks 40% of cardiac capillaries and halves perfused blood volume within the affected region. Capillary blockages colocalised strongly with pericytes, where capillary diameter was reduced by 37%. The pericyte relaxant adenosine increased capillary diameter by 21% at pericyte somata, decreased capillary block by 25% and increased perfusion volume by 57%. Thus, cardiac pericytes constrict coronary capillaries and reduce microvascular blood flow after ischaemia, despite re-opening of the culprit artery. Cardiac pericytes are therefore a novel therapeutic target in ischaemic heart disease.
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Neuro, Physiology & Pharmacology
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Neuro, Physiology & Pharmacology
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