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Publication Detail
Ice XV: A New Thermodynamically Stable Phase of Ice
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Salzmann CG, Radaelli PG, Mayer E, Finney JL
  • Publisher:
    AMER PHYSICAL SOC
  • Publication date:
    04/09/2009
  • Journal:
    PHYS REV LETT
  • Volume:
    103
  • Issue:
    10
  • Article number:
    105701
  • Print ISSN:
    0031-9007
  • Language:
    EN
  • Keywords:
    NEUTRON POWDER DIFFRACTION, LOW-TEMPERATURES, RAMAN-SPECTRA, VI, TRANSITION, PREDICTION
  • Addresses:
    Salzmann, CG
    Univ Oxford
    Dept Chem
    Oxford
    OX1 3QR
    England
Abstract
A new phase of ice, named ice XV, has been identified and its structure determined by neutron diffraction. Ice XV is the hydrogen-ordered counterpart of ice VI and is thermodynamically stable at temperatures below similar to 130 K in the 0.8 to 1.5 GPa pressure range. The regions of stability in the medium pressure range of the phase diagram have thus been finally mapped, with only hydrogen-ordered phases stable at 0 K. The ordered ice XV structure is antiferroelectric (P1), in clear disagreement with recent theoretical calculations predicting ferroelectric ordering (Cc).
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Dept of Chemistry
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