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Publication Detail
The honeycomb maze provides a novel test to study hippocampal-dependent spatial navigation.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Wood RA, Bauza M, Krupic J, Burton S, Delekate A, Chan D, O'Keefe J
  • Publication date:
    01/02/2018
  • Journal:
    Nature
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0028-0836
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Sainsbury Wellcome Centre, UCL, London W1T 4JG, UK.
Abstract
Here we describe the honeycomb maze, a behavioural paradigm for the study of spatial navigation in rats. The maze consists of 37 platforms that can be raised or lowered independently. Place navigation requires an animal to go to a goal platform from any of several start platforms via a series of sequential choices. For each, the animal is confined to a raised platform and allowed to choose between two of the six adjacent platforms, the correct one being the platform with the smallest angle to the goal-heading direction. Rats learn rapidly and their choices are influenced by three factors: the angle between the two choice platforms, the distance from the goal, and the angle between the correct platform and the direction of the goal. Rats with hippocampal damage are impaired in learning and their performance is affected by all three factors. The honeycomb maze represents a marked improvement over current spatial navigation tests, such as the Morris water maze, because it controls the choices of the animal at each point in the maze, provides the ability to assess knowledge of the goal direction from any location, enables the identification of factors influencing task performance and provides the possibility for concomitant single-cell recording.
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The Sainsbury Wellcome Centre
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Cell & Developmental Biology
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The Sainsbury Wellcome Centre
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