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Publication Detail
The role of autonomy-support versus control in the emergent writing behaviors of African-American Kindergarten children
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Gutman LM, Sulzby E
  • Publication date:
    01/01/1999
  • Pagination:
    170, 184
  • Journal:
    Reading Research and Instruction
  • Volume:
    39
  • Issue:
    2
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0886-0246
Abstract
This study examined children’s intrinsic motivation during an emergent letter writing task in both controlling and autonomy-supportive adult-child interactions. Using a repeated measures design, 20 African-American kindergartners from a predominately low-income elementary school were randomly assigned to experience either the autonomy-supportive followed by the controlling interaction or the controlling followed by the autonomy-supportive interaction. Using videotapes of the interactions, children’s motivation was coded according to categories based on Harter’s (1981,1982) Scale of Intrinsic-Extrinsic Orientation in the Classroom and Perceived Competence Scale for Children. Childrens’ letters were assessed using categories based on Sulzby’s (1990) Forms of Writing and Rereading Checklist. Results revealed that the autonomy-supportive versus controlling context of the task and the order of the interactions influenced children’s motivation. Childrens’ use of emergent literacy was also influenced by the context of the interaction. Implications for literacy learning and teaching are discussed. © 1999 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.
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