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Publication Detail
Why Do Hearing Aids Fail to Restore Normal Auditory Perception?
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Lesica NA
  • Publisher:
    Elsevier
  • Publication date:
    12/02/2018
  • Journal:
    Trends in Neurosciences
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0166-2236
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    Ear Institute, University College London, London, UK; Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. Electronic address: n.lesica@ucl.ac.uk.
Abstract
Hearing loss is a widespread condition that is linked to declines in quality of life and mental health. Hearing aids remain the treatment of choice, but, unfortunately, even state-of-the-art devices provide only limited benefit for the perception of speech in noisy environments. While traditionally viewed primarily as a loss of sensitivity, hearing loss is also known to cause complex distortions of sound-evoked neural activity that cannot be corrected by amplification alone. This Opinion article describes the effects of hearing loss on neural activity to illustrate the reasons why current hearing aids are insufficient and to motivate the use of new technologies to explore directions for improving the next generation of devices.
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