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Publication Detail
Tensile Forces and Mechanotransduction at Cell-Cell Junctions.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Review
  • Authors:
    Charras G, Yap AS
  • Publication date:
    23/04/2018
  • Pagination:
    R445, R457
  • Journal:
    Current biology : CB
  • Volume:
    28
  • Issue:
    8
  • Medium:
    Print
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0960-9822
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH, UK; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: g.charras@ucl.ac.uk.
Abstract
Cell-cell junctions are specializations of the plasma membrane responsible for physically integrating cells into tissues. We are now beginning to appreciate the diverse impacts that mechanical forces exert upon the integrity and function of these junctions. Currently, this is best understood for cadherin-based adherens junctions in epithelia and endothelia, where cell-cell adhesion couples the contractile cytoskeletons of cells together to generate tissue-scale tension. Junctional tension participates in morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Changes in tension can also be detected by mechanotransduction pathways that allow cells to communicate with each other. In this review, we discuss progress in characterising the forces present at junctions in physiological conditions; the cellular mechanisms that generate intrinsic tension and detect changes in tension; and, finally, we consider how tissue integrity is maintained in the face of junctional stresses.
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