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Publication Detail
Association of objectively measured physical activity with brain structure: UK Biobank study
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Hamer M, Sharma N, Batty GD
  • Publication date:
    18/05/2018
  • Journal:
    Journal of internal medicine
  • Medium:
    Print-Electronic
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0954-6820
  • Language:
    eng
  • Addresses:
    School Sport, Exercise& Health Sciences, Loughborough University, UK.
Abstract
Physical activity may be beneficial for cognition but mechanisms are unclear. We examined the association between objectively assessed physical activity and brain volume, with a focus on the hippocampus region.We used data from UK Biobank (n=5,272; aged 55.4±7.5 yrs; 45.6% men) collected through 2013-2016. Participants wore the Axivity AX3 wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer for seven days to assess habitual physical activity. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a standard Siemens Skyra 3T running VD13A SP4 to obtain images of the brain.There was an association between physical activity (per SD increase) and grey matter volume after adjustment for a range of covariates, although this association was only detected in older adults (>60 yrs old). We also observed associations of physical activity with both left (B=0.52, 95% CI, 0.01, 1.03; p=0.046) and right hippocampal volume (B=0.59, 95% CI, 0.08, 1.10; p=0.024) in covariate adjusted models.In summary, physical activity may play a role in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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