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Publication Detail
Characterisation of tissue-type metabolic content in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Marshall I, Thrippleton MJ, Bastin ME, Mollison D, Dickie DA, Chappell FM, Semple SIK, Cooper A, Pavitt S, Giovannoni G, Wheeler-Kingshott CAMG, Solanky BS, Weir CJ, Stallard N, Hawkins C, Sharrack B, Chataway J, Connick P, Chandran S
  • Publisher:
    Springer Nature
  • Publication date:
    01/08/2018
  • Pagination:
    1795, 1802
  • Journal:
    Journal of Neurology
  • Volume:
    265
  • Issue:
    8
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0340-5354
  • Language:
    English
  • Keywords:
    Multiple sclerosis, Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Brain metabolites, White matter lesions, Normal-appearing white matter
Abstract
Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy yields metabolic information and has proved to be a useful addition to structural imaging in neurological diseases. We applied short-echo time Spectroscopic Imaging in a cohort of 42 patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). Linear modelling with respect to brain tissue type yielded metabolite levels that were significantly different in white matter lesions compared with normal-appearing white matter, suggestive of higher myelin turnover (higher choline), higher metabolic rate (higher creatine) and increased glial activity (higher myo-inositol) within the lesions. These findings suggest that the lesions have ongoing cellular activity that is not consistent with the usual assumption of ‘chronic’ lesions in SPMS, and may represent a target for repair therapies.
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Neuroinflammation
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