UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Monitoring contaminants, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change with raptors, and links to human health
Abstract
© 2018, © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Capsule: Raptor research and monitoring informs issues of relevance to human health, including environmental contamination, emerging infectious diseases and environmental change. Aims: The paper examines the relevance of raptor research and monitoring to inform issues of relevance to human health, including environmental contamination, emerging vector-borne diseases and environmental change. Methods: Reviews of European Union policy context and role of raptor research and monitoring in detection of and response to contaminants. Examples include lead ammunition in White-tailed Sea Eagles Haliaeetus albicilla in Europe, and impacts of diclofenac on Gyps vultures in the Indian subcontinent. Comments on the relevance of raptor research and monitoring to emerging infectious diseases and environmental change, and considers the links between raptors and humans. Results: Biomonitoring of contaminants in raptors can perform useful purposes in relation to chemicals legislation. Raptors are useful sentinels of exposure to and effects of chemicals in the environment. Raptor research and monitoring can also elucidate environmental change and spread of emerging infectious diseases. Raptors are linked to humans through social, cultural and economic values. Conclusion: Raptors can be used to provide information relevant to human health and well-being. There are a number of challenges and opportunities in relating raptor research and monitoring to human health. Several areas with potential for development are outlined. The COST Action ‘European Raptor Biomonitoring Facility’ and the forthcoming LIFE APEX project will take forward relevant work.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Dept of Earth Sciences
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by