UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
PATCH CLAMP TECHNIQUES USED FOR STUDYING SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN SLICES OF MAMMALIAN BRAIN
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Sakmann B, Edwards F, Konnerth A, Takahashi T
  • Publication date:
    12/11/1989
  • Pagination:
    1107, 1118
  • Journal:
    Quarterly Journal of Experimental Physiology
  • Volume:
    74
  • Issue:
    6
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0144-8757
Abstract
Procedures are described for recording postsynaptic currents from neurones in slices of rat brain using patch clamp techniques. The method involves cutting brain slices (120‐300, µm thick) with a vibrating microtome followed by localization of cell somata, which can be clearly seen with Nomarski differential interference contrast optics in the light microscope. Tissue covering the identified cell is then removed mechanically and standard patch clamp techniques are applied. Using these methods, spontaneously occurring and stimulus‐evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were recorded from neurones in rat hippocampus at greatly improved resolution. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, to block presynaptic action potentials, spontaneous IPSCs seldom exceeded 25 pA. Evoked IPSCs elicited by constant electrical stimulation of a presynaptic neurone were larger and fluctuated in their amplitudes. Single‐channel currents, activated by the putative inhibitory transmitter γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA), had a size of about 1 pA. The number of postsynaptic channels activated by a packet of inhibitory transmitter is probably not more than thirty, nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported estimates for CNS synapses. This might reflect matching of synaptic efficacy to the high input resistance of hippocampal neurones and could be a requirement for fine tuning of inhibition. © 1989 The Physiological Society
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Neuro, Physiology & Pharmacology
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by