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Publication Detail
A Force-Induced Directional Switch of a Molecular Motor Enables Parallel Microtubule Bundle Formation
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Molodtsov MI, Mieck C, Dobbelaere J, Dammermann A, Westermann S, Vaziri A
  • Publication date:
    06/10/2016
  • Pagination:
    539, 552.e14
  • Journal:
    Cell
  • Volume:
    167
  • Issue:
    2
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    0092-8674
Abstract
© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) nucleate microtubules that can grow autonomously in any direction. To generate bundles of parallel microtubules originating from a single MTOC, the growth of multiple microtubules needs to coordinated, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that a conserved two-component system consisting of the plus-end tracker EB1 and the minus-end-directed molecular motor Kinesin-14 is sufficient to promote parallel microtubule growth. The underlying mechanism relies on the ability of Kinesin-14 to guide growing plus ends along existing microtubules. The generality of this finding is supported by yeast, Drosophila, and human EB1/Kinesin-14 pairs. We demonstrate that plus-end guiding involves a directional switch of the motor due to a force applied via a growing microtubule end. The described mechanism can account for the generation of parallel microtubule networks required for a broad range of cellular functions such as spindle assembly or cell polarization.
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