UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
The association of socio-economic status, race, psychosocial factors and outcome in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Sutcliffe N, Clarke AE, Gordon C, Farewell V, Isenberg DA
  • Publication date:
    01/01/1999
  • Pagination:
    1130, 1137
  • Journal:
    Rheumatology
  • Volume:
    38
  • Issue:
    11
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1462-0324
Abstract
Objective. To determine the relationship between socio-economic status, race, psychosocial factors and outcome in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. One hundred and ninety-five patients with SLE were studied at two centres in the UK (London and Birmingham). Information about sociodemographics, income, employment status, social support and satisfaction with care was obtained. Outcomes were assessed by end-organ damage, disease activity and employment status. Results. Non-Caucasian race, longer disease duration, higher disease activity and lower level of education were associated with more organ damage in SLE. More satisfaction with access to care and interpersonal aspects of care, but less satisfaction with time spent with doctors, were also associated with more damage. Very long disease duration was associated with higher disease activity. Patients with higher disease activity, lower level of education and from the Birmingham centre were more likely not to be working due to their lupus. Conclusion. Race and socio-economic status, as well as clinical and psychosocial factors, determine outcome in SLE.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by