UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/post_award/post_award_contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Brain-behaviour modes of covariation in healthy and clinically depressed young people
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Mihalik A, Ferreira FS, Rosa MJ, Moutoussis M, Ziegler G, Monteiro JM, Portugal L, Adams RA, Romero-Garcia R, Vértes PE, Kitzbichler MG, Váša F, Vaghi MM, Bullmore ET, Fonagy P, Goodyer IM, Jones PB, Dolan R, Mourao-Miranda J
  • Publisher:
    Nature Publishing Group
  • Publication date:
    08/08/2019
  • Journal:
    Scientific Reports
  • Volume:
    9
  • Issue:
    1
  • Article number:
    11536
  • Print ISSN:
    2045-2322
Abstract
Understanding how variations in dimensions of psychometrics, IQ and demographics relate to changes in brain connectivity during the critical developmental period of adolescence and early adulthood is a major challenge. This has particular relevance for mental health disorders where a failure to understand these links might hinder the development of better diagnostic approaches and therapeutics. Here, we investigated this question in 306 adolescents and young adults (14-24y, 25 clinically depressed) using a multivariate statistical framework, based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA). By linking individual functional brain connectivity profiles to self-report questionnaires, IQ and demographic data we identified two distinct modes of covariation. The first mode mapped onto an externalization/internalization axis and showed a strong association with sex. The second mode mapped onto a well-being/distress axis independent of sex. Interestingly, both modes showed an association with age. Crucially, the changes in functional brain connectivity associated with changes in these phenotypes showed marked developmental effects. The findings point to a role for the default mode, frontoparietal and limbic networks in psychopathology and depression.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers Show More
Author
Dept of Computer Science
Author
Imaging Neuroscience
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Imaging Neuroscience
Author
Dept of Computer Science
Author
Imaging Neuroscience
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by