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Publication Detail
Augmentation vaginoplasty with buccal mucosa for the surgical revision of postreconstructive vaginal stenosis: a case series
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Journal Article
  • Authors:
    Learner HI, Creighton SM, Wood D
  • Publication date:
    01/08/2019
  • Pagination:
    402.e1, 402.e7
  • Journal:
    Journal of Pediatric Urology
  • Volume:
    15
  • Issue:
    4
  • Status:
    Published
  • Print ISSN:
    1477-5131
Abstract
Background: Vaginal stenosis is a common consequence of vaginal reconstruction in childhood. Significant scarring can make dilation ineffective, and there maybe a paucity of skin to create perineal skin flaps. Numerous vaginoplasty techniques exist, including perineal skin flaps for distal stenosis and intestinal vaginoplasty requiring laparotomy and bowel anastomosis. Buccal mucosa graft is widely used in urethroplasty and has been reported in neovaginal construction. It is easily accessible with minimal graft site morbidity and provides a close functional replica to vaginal mucosa. Aim: The aim was to describe the use of buccal mucosa grafts for the surgical revision of postreconstructive vaginal stenosis. Method: The study setting was a tertiary centre for congenital gynaecological anomalies. Buccal mucosa grafting was provided to women with vaginal stenosis unsuitable for perineal skin flaps and in whom intestinal vaginoplasty was the next option. Four cases have been performed, and the medical notes were reviewed for clinical data. Results: Mean age at buccal mucosa vaginoplasty was 21 years (range 18–26 years). Two patients had a cloacal anomaly, one had mosaic Turner syndrome and one had postradiation vaginal stenosis. All four had undergone previous vaginal reconstruction. In all cases, there was a tight band of vaginal stenosis either too proximal or with insufficient perineal tissue to allow a perineal flap vaginoplasty. There were no immediate complications. Mean clinic follow-up was 16 months (3 months–4 years). Two patients were able to have penetrative sexual intercourse, and two were using vaginal dilators successfully. Patients have an email contact for the team nurse specialist and therefore are able to contact before clinical review if they develop concerns. Discussion: The use of buccal mucosal grafts for vaginoplasty is increasingly reported. This is the first detailed case series describing its use for augmentation vaginoplasty with postreconstructive/stenosis. Conclusions: All patients had a successful outcome with a normal capacity vagina, and two were able to have penetrative intercourse. This suggests that buccal mucosal graft vaginoplasty is a safe and effective alternative for women with previous vaginal reconstruction requiring surgery for vaginal stenosis.
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