UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
SICI during changing brain states: Differences in methodology can lead to different conclusions.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Ibáñez J, Spampinato DA, Paraneetharan V, Rothwell JC
  • Publication date:
    04/11/2019
  • Journal:
    Brain Stimul
  • Status:
    Published online
  • Country:
    United States
  • PII:
    S1935-861X(19)30433-4
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Movement preparation, Preparatory inhibition, Short intra-cortical inhibition, Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Short-latency intracortical inhibition (SICI) is extensively used to probe GABAergic inhibitory mechanisms in M1. Task-related changes in SICI are presumed to reflect changes in the central excitability of GABAergic pathways. Usually, the level of SICI is evaluated using a single intensity of conditioning stimulus so that inhibition can be compared in different brain states. OBJECTIVE: Here, we show that this approach may sometimes be inadequate since distinct conclusions can be drawn if a different CS intensity is used. METHODS: We measured SICI using a range of CS intensities at rest and during a warned simple reaction time task. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that SICI changes that occurred during the task could be either larger or smaller than at rest depending on the intensity of the CS. These findings indicate that careful interpretation of results are needed when a single intensity of CS is used to measure task-related physiological changes.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers
Author
Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
Author
Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by