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Publication Detail
Ketamine can reduce harmful drinking by pharmacologically rewriting drinking memories.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Das RK, Gale G, Walsh K, Hennessy VE, Iskandar G, Mordecai LA, Brandner B, Kindt M, Curran HV, Kamboj SK
  • Publication date:
    26/11/2019
  • Pagination:
    5187
  • Journal:
    Nat Commun
  • Volume:
    10
  • Issue:
    1
  • Status:
    Published online
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    10.1038/s41467-019-13162-w
  • Language:
    eng
Abstract
Maladaptive reward memories (MRMs) are involved in the development and maintenance of acquired overconsumption disorders, such as harmful alcohol and drug use. The process of memory reconsolidation - where stored memories become briefly labile upon retrieval - may offer a means to disrupt MRMs and prevent relapse. However, reliable means for pharmacologically weakening MRMs in humans remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine is able to disrupt MRMs in hazardous drinkers when administered immediately after their retrieval. MRM retrieval + ketamine (RET + KET) effectively reduced the reinforcing effects of alcohol and long-term drinking levels, compared to ketamine or retrieval alone. Blood concentrations of ketamine and its metabolites during the critical 'reconsolidation window' predicted beneficial changes only following MRM reactivation. Pharmacological reconsolidation interference may provide a means to rapidly rewrite maladaptive memory and should be further pursued in alcohol and drug use disorders.
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