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Publication Detail
Feasibility study of hospital antimicrobial stewardship analytics using electronic health records
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Dutey-Magni P, Gill MJ, Mcnulty D, Sohal G, Hayward A, Shallcross L
  • Publication date:
    04/03/2021
  • Journal:
    JAC-Antimicrobial Resistance
  • Volume:
    3
  • Issue:
    1
  • Article number:
    dlab018
  • Status:
    Published
Abstract
Background: Hospital antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes are multidisciplinary initiatives to optimise the use of antimicrobials. Most hospitals depend on time-consuming manual audits to monitor clinicians’ prescribing. But much of the information needed could be sourced from electronic health records (EHRs). Objectives: To develop an informatics methodology to analyse characteristics of hospital AMS practice using routine electronic prescribing and laboratory records. Methods: Feasibility study using electronic prescribing, laboratory and clinical coding records from adult patients admitted to six specialties at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK (September 2017–August 2018). The study involved: (1) a review of antimicrobial stewardship standards of care; (2) their translation into concepts measurable from commonly available EHRs; (3) pilot application in an EHR cohort study (n=61,679 admissions). Results: We developed data modelling methods to characterise the use of antimicrobials (antimicrobial therapy episode linkage methods, therapy table, therapy changes). Prescriptions were linked into antimicrobial therapy episodes (mean 2.4 prescriptions/episode; mean length of therapy of 5.8 days) enabling production of several actionable findings. For example, 22% of therapy episodes for low-severity community acquired pneumonia were congruent with prescribing guidelines, with a tendency to use antibiotics with a broader spectrum. Analysis of therapy changes revealed a delay in switching from intravenous to oral therapy by an average 3.6 days [95% CI: 3.4; 3.7]. Performance of microbial cultures prior to treatment initiation occurred in just 22% of antibacterial prescriptions. The proposed methods enabled fine-grained monitoring of AMS practice all the way down to specialties, wards, and individual clinical teams by case mix, enabling more meaningful peer comparison. Conclusions: It is feasible to use hospital EHRs to construct rapid, meaningful measures of prescribing quality with potential to support quality improvement interventions (audit/feedback to prescribers), engagement with front-line clinicians on optimising prescribing, and AMS impact evaluation studies.
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