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Publication Detail
Millennium Cohort Study: Seventh Survey, 2018
  • Publication Type:
    Dataset
  • Creators:
    Fitzsimons E, Calderwood L
  • Publisher:
    UK Data Service
  • Date created:
    2020
  • Place of publication:
    Essex
  • Identifier:
    8682
  • Series:
    Millennium Cohort Study
  • Status:
    Published
  • Version:
    7th Survey
  • OA Licence:
    Y
  • Temporal Coverage:
    MCS7; Child of the New Century
  • Keywords:
    Millennium Cohort Study, Child of the New Century
  • Notes:
    The UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) fills a major gap of 30 years since the previous birth cohort, and is unique as a longitudinal resource for providing evidence on growing up in the UK in the 21st century. The study began with an original sample of 18,818 cohort members, recruited across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in infancy, in 2000-02. It has conducted seven face-to-face data collections to date, at ages 9 months, 3, 5, 7, 11, 14 and 17 years. The study provides multiple measures of the cohort members’ physical, socio-emotional, cognitive and behavioural development over time, as well as detailed information on their daily life, behaviour and experiences. Alongside this, rich information on economic circumstances, parenting, relationships and family life is available from both resident parents. The data it generates provides a vital source of evidence on key policy areas, including in education, parenting, adolescent mental health and wellbeing, and childhood obesity. The MCS is core-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and co-funded by a consortium of government departments. The achieved sample size at Age 17 was 10,757 (10,625) cohort members (families). This period of transition to adulthood marked a pivotal stage in cohort members’ development, as their paths diverged in a way that will greatly influence their future wellbeing. Previously, schooling will have been the main activity common to the majority of cohort members. However, by age 17, cohort members will have taken important decisions in relation to schooling, further education, training, work, and living at home. Capturing these transitions well, alongside the contemporary factors underlying the was critical. Data captured included: family circumstances including employment and income; relationships with parents; family and peers; risky behaviours; social media engagement; effort on activities such as education/school; attitudes and preferences. Measuring social and emotional development, mental health and cognitive development and using well-validated instruments, was also a critical component of the survey. The study continued to measure height, weight and body fat of cohort members at this sweep. The Age 17 Sweep is an exceptionally significant data resource, providing an essential point of reference in longitudinal data and research. The outstanding rigour and value of this resource has led to wide use internationally and across disciplines. MCS has generated over 1000 publications since its inception. Via the publications it has generated, this dataset has been a formative influence on research and policy in both social sciences and health.
Description
The UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) fills a major gap of 30 years since the previous birth cohort, and is unique as a longitudinal resource for providing evidence on growing up in the UK in the 21st century. The study began with an original sample of 18,818 cohort members, recruited across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in infancy, in 2000-02. It has conducted seven face-to-face data collections to date, at ages 9 months, 3, 5, 7, 11, 14 and 17 years. The study provides multiple measures of the cohort members’ physical, socio-emotional, cognitive and behavioural development over time, as well as detailed information on their daily life, behaviour and experiences. Alongside this, rich information on economic circumstances, parenting, relationships and family life is available from both resident parents. The data it generates provides a vital source of evidence on key policy areas, including in education, parenting, adolescent mental health and wellbeing, and childhood obesity. The MCS is core-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), and co-funded by a consortium of government departments. The achieved sample size at Age 17 was 10,757 (10,625) cohort members (families). This period of transition to adulthood marked a pivotal stage in cohort members’ development, as their paths diverged in a way that will greatly influence their future wellbeing. Previously, schooling will have been the main activity common to the majority of cohort members. However, by age 17, cohort members will have taken important decisions in relation to schooling, further education, training, work, and living at home. Capturing these transitions well, alongside the contemporary factors underlying the was critical. Data captured included: family circumstances including employment and income; relationships with parents; family and peers; risky behaviours; social media engagement; effort on activities such as education/school; attitudes and preferences. Measuring social and emotional development, mental health and cognitive development and using well-validated instruments, was also a critical component of the survey. The study continued to measure height, weight and body fat of cohort members at this sweep. The Age 17 Sweep is an exceptionally significant data resource, providing an essential point of reference in longitudinal data and research. The outstanding rigour and value of this resource has led to wide use internationally and across disciplines. MCS has generated over 1000 publications since its inception. Via the publications it has generated, this dataset has been a formative influence on research and policy in both social sciences and health.
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