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Publication Detail
On the shuttling across the blood-brain barrier via tubule formation: Mechanism and cargo avidity bias
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Tian X, Leite DM, Scarpa E, Nyberg S, Fullstone G, Forth J, Matias D, Apriceno A, Poma A, Duro-Castano A, Vuyyuru M, Harker-Kirschneck L, Šarić A, Zhang Z, Xiang P, Fang B, Tian Y, Luo L, Rizzello L, Battaglia G
  • Publisher:
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
  • Publication date:
    27/11/2020
  • Pagination:
    eabc4397
  • Journal:
    Science Advances
  • Volume:
    6
  • Issue:
    48
  • Status:
    Published
  • Language:
    en
Abstract
The blood-brain barrier is made of polarized brain endothelial cells (BECs) phenotypically conditioned by the central nervous system (CNS). Although transport across BECs is of paramount importance for nutrient uptake as well as ridding the brain of waste products, the intracellular sorting mechanisms that regulate successful receptor-mediated transcytosis in BECs remain to be elucidated. Here, we used a synthetic multivalent system with tunable avidity to the low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 1 (LRP1) to investigate the mechanisms of transport across BECs. We used a combination of conventional and super-resolution microscopy, both in vivo and in vitro, accompanied with biophysical modeling of transport kinetics and membrane-bound interactions to elucidate the role of membrane-sculpting protein syndapin-2 on fast transport via tubule formation. We show that high-avidity cargo biases the LRP1 toward internalization associated with fast degradation, while mid-avidity augments the formation of syndapin-2 tubular carriers promoting a fast shuttling across.
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