UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Incidence, healthcare-seeking behaviours, antibiotic use and natural history of common infection syndromes in England: results from the Bug Watch community cohort study.
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Publication Sub Type:
    Article
  • Authors:
    Smith CM, Shallcross LJ, Dutey-Magni P, Conolly A, Fuller C, Hill S, Jhass A, Marcheselli F, Michie S, Mindell JS, Ridd MJ, Tsakos G, Hayward AC, Fragaszy EB, PASS research group
  • Publication date:
    22/01/2021
  • Pagination:
    105
  • Journal:
    BMC Infect Dis
  • Volume:
    21
  • Issue:
    1
  • Status:
    Published
  • Country:
    England
  • PII:
    10.1186/s12879-021-05811-7
  • Language:
    eng
  • Keywords:
    Antibiotic stewardship, Incidence, common infections, community cohort studies, healthcare-seeking behaviour
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Better information on the typical course and management of acute common infections in the community could inform antibiotic stewardship campaigns. We aimed to investigate the incidence, management, and natural history of a range of infection syndromes (respiratory, gastrointestinal, mouth/dental, skin/soft tissue, urinary tract, and eye). METHODS: Bug Watch was an online prospective community cohort study of the general population in England (2018-2019) with weekly symptom reporting for 6 months. We combined symptom reports into infection syndromes, calculated incidence rates, described the proportion leading to healthcare-seeking behaviours and antibiotic use, and estimated duration and severity. RESULTS: The cohort comprised 873 individuals with 23,111 person-weeks follow-up. The mean age was 54 years and 528 (60%) were female. We identified 1422 infection syndromes, comprising 40,590 symptom reports. The incidence of respiratory tract infection syndromes was two per person year; for all other categories it was less than one. 194/1422 (14%) syndromes led to GP (or dentist) consultation and 136/1422 (10%) to antibiotic use. Symptoms usually resolved within a week and the third day was the most severe. CONCLUSIONS: Most people reported managing their symptoms without medical consultation. Interventions encouraging safe self-management across a range of acute infection syndromes could decrease pressure on primary healthcare services and support targets for reducing antibiotic prescribing.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers Show More
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Clinical Epidemiology
Author
MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
Author
Institute of Health Informatics
Author
Comprehensive CTU at UCL
Author
Epidemiology & Public Health
Author
Practice & Policy
Author
Institute of Health Informatics
Author
Inst for Risk & Disaster Reduction
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Clinical, Edu & Hlth Psychology
Author
Epidemiology & Public Health
Author
Institute of Health Informatics
Author
Epidemiology & Public Health
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by