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Publication Detail
A Model of the Cosmos in the ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism.
Abstract
The Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek astronomical calculator, has challenged researchers since its discovery in 1901. Now split into 82 fragments, only a third of the original survives, including 30 corroded bronze gearwheels. Microfocus X-ray Computed Tomography (X-ray CT) in 2005 decoded the structure of the rear of the machine but the front remained largely unresolved. X-ray CT also revealed inscriptions describing the motions of the Sun, Moon and all five planets known in antiquity and how they were displayed at the front as an ancient Greek Cosmos. Inscriptions specifying complex planetary periods forced new thinking on the mechanization of this Cosmos, but no previous reconstruction has come close to matching the data. Our discoveries lead to a new model, satisfying and explaining the evidence. Solving this complex 3D puzzle reveals a creation of genius-combining cycles from Babylonian astronomy, mathematics from Plato's Academy and ancient Greek astronomical theories.
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Author
Dept of Civil, Environ &Geomatic Eng
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
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