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Publication Detail
Associations Between Psychosis and Visual Acuity Impairment: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Several theories propose that visual acuity impairment is associated with psychosis. Visual impairment could lead to psychosis or the converse, or they may share underlying pathology or risk factors. In the first evidence synthesis in this area for over 25 years, we collated studies measuring the association between visual acuity impairment and psychosis. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases for studies published from 1992 to 2020, using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale to assess risk of bias. We narratively synthesized findings, and meta-analysed sufficiently homogenous results. RESULTS: We included 40 papers which reported on 31 studies. Evidence from seven cohort studies was inconsistent, which precluded meta-analysis of this study design. These contradictory results also made it difficult to draw conclusions regarding a temporal association. We found evidence for an association from eight cross-sectional studies treating visual acuity impairment as the exposure and psychosis as the outcome [pooled Odds Ratio (OR) =1.76, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.34 - 2.31], and four with the reverse exposure and outcome (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.17 - 2.92). Seven case control studies with mixed findings were found, but only two primarily addressed our research question, and these findings were mixed. CONCLUSIONS: Although evidence supports a cross-sectional association between visual acuity impairment and psychosis, further research is needed to clarify the temporal direction, given the mixed findings in cohort studies. Understanding the association may give insights into prevention strategies for people at risk of visual acuity impairment and psychosis.
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Division of Psychiatry
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Division of Psychiatry
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Division of Psychiatry
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Division of Psychiatry
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