UCL  IRIS
Institutional Research Information Service
UCL Logo
Please report any queries concerning the funding data grouped in the sections named "Externally Awarded" or "Internally Disbursed" (shown on the profile page) to your Research Finance Administrator. Your can find your Research Finance Administrator at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/research/rs-contacts.php by entering your department
Please report any queries concerning the student data shown on the profile page to:

Email: portico-services@ucl.ac.uk

Help Desk: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/ras/portico/helpdesk
Publication Detail
Removal and Dispersal of Biofluid Films by Powered Medical Devices: Modelling Infectious Agent Spreading in Dentistry
  • Publication Type:
    Journal article
  • Authors:
    Eames I, D’Aiuto F, Shahreza S, Javanmardi Y, Balachandran R, Hyde M, Ng Y-L, Gulabivala K, Watson S, Davies H, Szita N, Khajeh J, Suvan J, Moeendarbary E
  • Publisher:
    Elsevier BV
  • Publication date:
    27/10/2021
  • Journal:
    iScience
  • Issue:
    103344
  • Status:
    Published
  • Language:
    English
  • Keywords:
    Aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs), disease transmission, droplets, infectious agents
  • Notes:
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Abstract
Summary Medical procedures can disperse infectious agents and spread disease. Particularly, dental procedures may pose a high risk of disease transmission as they use high-powered instruments operating within the oral cavity that may contain infectious microbiota or viruses. Here we assess the ability of powered dental devices in removing the biofluid films and identified mechanical, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic forces as the main underlying mechanisms of removal and dispersal processes. Our results indicate that potentially infectious agents can be removed and dispersed immediately after dental instrument engagement with the adherent biofluid film while the degree of their dispersal is rapidly depleted due to removal of the source and dilution by the coolant water. We found that droplets, created by high-speed drill interactions typically travel ballistically while aerosol-laden air tends to flow as a current over surfaces. Our mechanistic investigation offers plausible routes for reducing the spread of infection during invasive medical procedures.
Publication data is maintained in RPS. Visit https://rps.ucl.ac.uk
 More search options
UCL Researchers Show More
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
Author
Restorative Dental Sciences
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
Author
Restorative Dental Sciences
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
Author
Dept of Mechanical Engineering
Author
Restorative Dental Sciences
Author
Restorative Dental Sciences
Author
Dept of Biochemical Engineering
University College London - Gower Street - London - WC1E 6BT Tel:+44 (0)20 7679 2000

© UCL 1999–2011

Search by